DBS Check

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Failing a DBS Check? Not Possible!

However, this is not possible – a DBS check is not an exam, it is not a pass or fail the test – it is simply an information-gathering exercise.

The information is there so that the employer can learn 2 things:

Firstly, was the candidate honest when asked about their conviction – although I would say employers should allow a bit of grace in this regard and ensure a conversation happens if there is a discrepancy – as what gets written down on a DBS can sometimes be worded differently from what a person considers to be their charge. This could be pure and simple human error.

Secondly, so that the employer can complete a risk assessment to decide if the person poses a risk in the workplace – does the employer feel that either the business, staff or service users are at possible risk of harm due to the conviction.

The issue at present is that this is not happening – Business in the Community (BITC) found that 75% of employers admitted to discriminating against candidates who disclosed a criminal record. This is employers openly admitting that they have not carried out a risk assessment, they have simply seen the conviction and decided that they do not want that person working for them.

This is the challenge – it is a common human reaction to see the title of a conviction and think the worst, imagine the things that this person has done…and feel anxious about having them in the workplace, but one thing that is always true about humans is their ability to change. Are you the same person you were 30 years ago? 10 years ago, or even 5? 

The best way forward is to have a conversation with the candidate – consider the candidate’s circumstances at the time of the offence including whether there were any previous issues with housing, education, employment, managing their finances and income, lifestyle and associates, relationships, drugs and alcohol, emotional wellbeing or health. Consider whether there were any aggravating or mitigating circumstances. As part of the risk assessment process, an employer should try to establish the candidate’s attitude at the time of the offence. Look for the candidate to be open and honest, rather than denying or minimising what they have done. Does the candidate show any insight into their own behaviour, any indication of changed thinking, changes in their circumstances and, where relevant, victim empathy and not victim blame? Many people with recent convictions have reached the point where they want to put their offending behind them. If the offence isn’t work-related or if the candidate does not pose a risk to the level of the post, the employer could consider recruiting them if, in all other respects, they are suitable for the job

BITC, Ban the Box 2018.

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Find Us At:

The Trinity Centre
Market Square
North Ormesby
Middlesbrough
TS3 6LD

Our Numbers

01642 989669
07749 523154

Email

admin@cleanslatesolutions.org.uk

Charity Number

1190630

He Concludes, I’ll Forever Wipe The Slate Clean Of Their Sins

Hebrews 10:17-27 .17

He Concludes, I’ll Forever Wipe The Slate Clean Of Their Sins

Hebrews 10:17-27 .17

©Clean Slate Solutions 2021

©Clean Slate Solutions 2021